Art-ing, bookmaking, NaNo, and poetry.

Sorta.

I’ve been up to my pointed little ears in work.  Gallery Nite was last week, so that’s always kinda epic on November because everyone is trying to get everyone else to buy what they’re selling.

(NB:  I actually sold a skein of yarn.  Mind, y’all, it was like a $15 skein of yarn, but baby-steps, right?)

I was also busy because my bookmaking class at the ARTgarage went (and I think it went well, but I also haven’t looked at the evaluations because evaluations scare the bejeezus out of me after years teaching College Composition.  Just no.)

We made six book-types in six hours:  instabooks (five forms), hard-backed concertina/accordion books, pamphlet books (they did 3-hole, and I showed them 5-hole), “easy” Coptic bound (still took an hour and a half), Japanese stab stitch (the easiest version but with supplemental instructions on the other three I have wandering around), and a folded altered-book form.

So, yeah, a lot of books in a very short amount of time.

5-hole pamphlet bound sample book

 

“easy” Coptic bound sample book

These are two of the books that we made.  Everyone chose their own colors for everything, so no person’s book was like anyone else’s unless the person chose it to be.  These were the ones I made during the class so that I could show the students what to do.

It’s actually kinda difficult to make the book and talk about making the book at the same time.  I hadn’t expected that for some reason.  I think, if the class goes again, I’ll be better prepared for that difficulty.

…it totally didn’t help that I hadn’t made books in a while and kinda hadn’t expected the class to actually go.

*whistles*

I’m thinking about talking to the SAW coordinator at the ARTgarage and seeing if a bookmaking class (or papermaking or some sort of fiber arts class) might not be a good addition to the standard curriculum of painting, pastels, and drawing.  Not that that isn’t all well and good and necessary, but it seems like it might be nice to start introducing them to alternative art-making forms, right?

What got me thinking about seeing about these additions is that an art!friend of mine asked me (and a bunch of other artists) if we would be interested in helping out with a high school (portable) mural project.  I was, so I am. *\o/*

And, another art!friend of mine is putting together another show and has asked me if I’d like to play.  This is my friend who coordinated and curated the Circus Nerve show last April, which was amazing and bizarre and we should totally do another circus-themed show because that was fantastic!   The piece I made specifically for the show was this guy:

unnamed friends: pyramid-bird
2012
acrylic and spray paint on canvas
Katrina (‘Trie) Blasingame

So, yeah, that’s exciting!

And, NaNo is proceeding apace.  I’ve actually cracked 40,000, so only 10,000 to go!

Mind, y’all, I think I’m only through about a third of my actual plot, but meh.  This silly thing is actually going to be a fully conceptualized and plotted out novel if I die trying! <–There shall be no dying; there shall only be victory!

And, that brings us to poetry.  I have been promising, so here are some of the poems I’ve been writing and posting on my on-the-go studio Tumblr/fandom Tumblr (because, if y’all have noticed, a lot of my art-practice is highly conceptualized from visual culture/popular culture, fairy tales, myths, legends, and well, yeah).

untitled
2012
Katrina (‘Trie) Blasingame

 

Henry, or Meeting Aurora
2012
Katrina (‘Trie) Blasingame

 

Rumple
2012
Katrina (‘Trie) Blasingame

 

deadlights
2012
Katrina (‘Trie) Blasingame

If you want to see more, and you just can’t wait until the next time I post some, don’t want to follow my Tumblr, or be my friend on Instagram, I have a folder on Flickr for my Instagramed-poetry.

Okay, I really must go off and commit more literary atrocities.

Have a good Thanksgiving or Thursday, depending on where y’all are!

NaNo on!

Courage.

series close-ups

Presenting spindle’s work, Zellandine’s denouement.  Up close and personal.

For y’all’s joy and art-ness.

Okay, I know that I showed y’all an installation image, but meh, wouldn’t y’all like to see them closer?

spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: the moss from Allerleirauh's tree
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
mixed fiber art batt from Hello Purl (spun by me)
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: first born
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
commercial yarn, plastic-covered electronics wire
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement:
100 years in the tower
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
copper wire, wood sphere, spray paint, carded (by me) fleece, yarn from Interlacements
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: Midas' beanstalk
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
commercial yarn, spray paint, recycled tin can, wood sphere, carded (by me) fleece
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: mermaid's garden
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
commercial yarn, yarn from Interlacements, recycled cardboard cones, spray paint, spray glitter
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: Oyster emotions
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
recycled bottle caps, recycled (and gutted) lightbulbs, carded (by me) fleece, spray paint, spray glitter
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement: from straw to gold
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
spray paint, recycled cardboard yarn cones
spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement:
ambulatory mushroom forest (detail)
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
yarn (dyed and spun by me), copper wire, plastic-covered electronics wire, wooden sphere, spray paint, silk/stainless steel yarn from Habu

Here’s the full piece:

spindle's work, Zellandine's denouement:
ambulatory mushroom forest
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
2012
yarn (dyed and spun by me), copper wire, plastic-covered electronics wire, wooden sphere, spray paint, silk/stainless steel yarn from Habu

So, yeah, that’s the series so far.  There’s more pieces coming, probably for the next quarter at the ARTgarage.

Oh, also, I build a knitty knotty today out of PVC pipe. <–Melissa from Hellp Purl has one; that’s where I got the idea.

And, if y’all are looking for something to do this Friday:

Come to Circus Nerve.  You know you want to. *wriggles fingers tentacles hypnotically*

Courage.

slacker=me

Okay, not really.

I’ve been running around with job interviews, tiny plantlings, making a new piece for Circus Nerve, and fighting off weather-induced migraines.

My life, it is full.

So, this week’s post is about half done (mostly because I forgot I have 30 images that I needed to, ya know, process).

To tide y’all over: Live Action Angry Birds movie trailer (not real unfortunately).

Attacked by mechanical ladybugs. At least, it’s better than being rejected by a toaster.

I’m mixing my metaphors again.  Y’all know how that goes.

I’ve been reading Bella Tuscany again; I actually finished it a couple of days ago.  I don’t know why I needed to read this again, but in retrospect, it probably has to do with the way that Frances Mayes talks about the way art is alive and part of the everyday in Italy:  all the local chapels have magnificent icons of Mary and works by Renaissance Masters.

It got me in the mood to create the PowerPoint for Gnome’s Humanities classes and talk about how the definition of art has changed in such drastic ways and how art has inundated the everyday because there are artists that want their art to be part of everyday experience (like the artist consortium poketo) and artists who create monumental works for the everyday like Dr. Evermor (artists who are referred to as “vernacular artists”).  This everyday-ness has become so prevelant that Aestheticians have begun talking about “everyday aesthetics”:  the aesthetics of the hotel, the football game, the places and spaces that we live in every day of our lives.

I have these books that I always return to, that speak certain things to me, that change each time that I read them because, each time I read them, I’m a different person.  They’re battered and torn not because of abuse but because they have been loved shabby like a favorite woobie blanket or a ridiculously ugly acid-green sweater that was bestowed when a dear friend grew too talk for it and given with love because she knew that I would never grow too tall for it and would always love that it was ridiculously ugly ’cause that’s the way I am.

It explains why I have so very many books:  I need them close and physical and accessible.  It’s a physical pain when I desperately need to read something that’s been put away into storage because we don’t have enough book shelves yet or because the dear book-friend I long for has been buried behind so many other books that it can’t be found.

A month or two ago, I had a deep longing to read the first five-ish chapters of Owlsight by Mercedes Lackey because of Keisha.  There’s something about when she abruptly uproots her life with her family to become the town Healer that seemed like the exact thing to celebrate my first year anniversary in Wisconsin, and when Keisha learns to ground-and-shield for the first time, how she talks about never having dreamed of flying but always having dreamed of being an oak tree.  I know how she feels.

I’ve never once dreamed of flying:  I dream of falling, of zombie apocalypses, of far-flung battles, and of a violinist I might have been once-upon-a-time in another life.

But not flying.

Okay, on my Kindle counts as accessible too.  I kinda carry my Kindle with me everywhere because I keep my favorite fanfics on it, ever at the ready:  like A Farm in Iowa.  I think I’ve read this fic (which is like 300-400+ pages long) 5 or 6 times since I moved to Wisconsin—because it always reminds me about finding Home in unlikely places and in unlikely people.

Wisconsin was like that for me.  Wisconsin is my blue-painted bedroom to lay my head down in when I’m cranky and hate the world or my farm after a long life of cranky and being misunderstood.

I like it here, and I like the people that I’ve met here.

So, yeah.  Welcome to the random thinking about books.  There’s thinking coming about The Parasol Protectorate also, but right now, I think that *waves hand* all of the above book-thinking is probably enough.

And, a bit revealing.

*feels exposed*

In a completely unrelated (at least, obviously related) event, I’ve been asked to join a group show at the end of April:  Circus Nerve.

It’s very exciting.  I had met the curator at a show at IQ’s (before it closed), so I know her a little (her name’s Natalie).  Evidently, she had been at the ARTgarage and saw my studio and work and asked me to join the show.

IT’S VERY EXCITING, ISN’T IT?!?

There will be more about this very exciting event as it unfolds.

\o/

Courage and cake!