wow, too long.

so, yeah, waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too long.  sorry.  THINGS.

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okay, for those of you that don’t speak squid, the last couple-three weeks were spent in a combination of cleaning out my studio at the ARTgarage (for reasons), writing like 4-5 articles a week plus doing the video review things, recording projecTransparency vids, co-hosting my first ever podcast, and fighting up the steep learning curve that is ALL THINGS ADOBE.

and patreon.  have i mentioned i have a patreon?

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A cultural anthropologist’s observation of visual culture in action. Or, I went to Kitsune Kon and bought a bunch of ears.

So, catching up on what I was going to squee-splode about last week.

Weekend before last, I went to Kitsune Kon in Appleton. It was a lovely time at a small Kon; it wasn’t nearly as overwhelming (or as spread about) as ACen is, so there’s that.

Okay, the costumes are a bit better at ACen, but that has more to do with a larger amount of people, so the so-so costumes kinda get buried in the really fantastic costumes. Although, there were several really nice costumes: a Sailor Pluto (which is always kinda the rarest of the Sailor Scouts to see), some creepy Silent Hill-esque medical creatures, a Vash with a truly lovely coat, and a Wolfwood replete with ginormous gun-cross. My favorites, by far, were an incredibly tall Castiel who didn’t really respond in any way other than to do the Cas Nod of Acknowledgment (I swear I saw a Crowley wandering about too) and the cutest little 7-year old dressed as Kiki replete with GiGi (that’s the little, black cat).

It was really nice. And, I bought a bunch of ears.

These are kinda prosthetic ears made by Madqueens Jody Tonn. They basically hook around your ears and stay there. I wore them most of the day, and they were plenty comfortable. Madqueens was assisted by here lovely shop-neighbor Jeff Jacobs of It is Vapor.

These ears and pirate bunny hat are by Pawstar. <–All their stuff is super cute.

…I kinda wandered around wearing the cat-ears-kitty-kitty with the fae ears. I’m weird like that.

This is Kuma-chan from Ouran High School Host Club. I call him “Mr. Flootie.” <–Like, from Gail Carriger‘s The Parasol Protectorate series. ‘Cause he’s all disapproving.

…if he bopped around with a couple of single-shot pistols and would bring me proper tea, that would be fine too.

I got him from Anime Fan Zone.

Gnome got himself this grunty. It’s the grunty from the .hack manga series rather than the video games or anime. (Official site is here.)

Grunties are cute and cuddly. Except for the Noble Grunties; they’re pretentious dicks.

I didn’t manage to get the name of the shop that sold these, but I did get the card of a shop that does really fantastic buttons of characters from different tv shows. <–Specifically, the Doctor Who buttons.

This was made by one of Gnome’s students: Kitsune Kon was her first exhibiting con. I’m going to be receiving a commissioned piece from her soon.

Okay. That’s it for now.

Courage and cake.

the continuing saga of squid-approved artists

Continuing my waxing rhapsodic about artists that I really, really enjoy, I give to you–Camilla d’Errico (and on Facebook)!

 

The first time I saw Camilla d’Errico’s work was in an issue of Hi Fructose (and on Facebook <–Can y’all tell that I’m all about pimping other people across the interwebs?), which, if you haven’t been reading Hi Fructose, you should be.  New Contemporary, Pop Art.  What isn’t there to luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurve?  I totally need to actually just suck it up and get a subscription so I don’t miss anything.

 

No Ordinary Love

What I love about d’Errico is her use of creatures juxtaposed with anime girls.  There’s something incredibly rich about this juxtaposition.  Like the creatures are an extension of the anime girls’ personalities; like they’re part of the stories that the girls write for themselves.

 

Such as No Ordinary Love.

 

Due to the presence of both the black and white crows, there’s this connection to the story of the crow in Greek mythology and how Apollo initially changed crows from white to black for telling untruths and then, after discovering that the crow had been telling the truth all along, made crows sacred and in charge of foretelling important deaths. <–Please note that actually just turning the crow back to white wasn’t an option.

 

There is a love story in here somewhere, and while love stories of any sort kinda make me want to hork, there’s something epic to this one.  She is the child of Water and Sky, the product of a broken home;  she’s not supposed to exist, acknowledged by none.

 

Then, there are also d’Errico’s nostalgia illustrations.

 

Glow Friends

Seriously, who didn’t have a glow worm as kid?  It’s like the quintessential 80s kid toy.  I fondly remember mine–received for Christmas when I was about 8 years old.  For a kid who was always afraid of what was in the dark (not afraid of the dark; it’s a very important distinction), a glow worm was more that a great present; it was comforting.

 

And warm.  I remember that it was warm to sleep with.  All that glowing makes for warm sleeping.

 

The little girl’s dress also makes it look like she escaped from whomever was supposed to be watching her after church on a Sunday afternoon.  <–No, I have never in my life ruined my church clothes (when I still had to go to church) by playing outside in them.  Not me.

 

 

And what kinda anime/manga illustration artist would d’Errico be if she didn’t reference He-Man on occasion?

 

 

Sorceress

 

It’s such a beautiful interpretation of the Sorceress from He-Man.  All wonderful blue-orange complementary color cord but with that delicate sadness that permeated the Sorceress due to her inability to keep her daughter, Teela, because of her Grey Skull duties and the loss of the Adam’s sister Adora.

 

Okay, I’m a bit of a dork that I remember this from when I was a kid.

 

But, it’s really nice to see other artists that are connected to their cultural moments like Camilla d’Errico and Aya Kato (there are other, but these are the ones that I’ve done blog-y bits on so far) and easily, and comfortably, reference popular culture.

 

And cephalopods.

 

Tickle Monster