*tra lala la la*

So, evidently, I flaked last week in getting the blog done. In my own defense, it was hella hot, and neither Hemlock House nor tentacle-made studios has air-conditioning.

I really managed to work in like 45 minute increments and watched a lot of Numb3rs.

But, since you’ve all been so very, very good while I was trying not to die, I have an image-heavy post!

*whistles*

So, yeah, this is the first embroidered drawing (in-process) in this project right.

It’s kinda slow-going because I don’t always have the patience to sit still and embroider.  It’s why I never learned to do it when I was a tiny squidlet.

I’m much better with papermaking because it’s really active.  And messy.

PAPERMAKING IS HYDROPHILIC.

It’s water-loving, which means that you’re going to get wet.

So, the first thing that you need is pulp.  I don’t have a hollander beater, so I order my pulp pre-beaten from Twinrocker Handmade Paper.

And, yep, everything with papermaking sounds abusive and vaguely pervy.

You’ll also need waterproof, non-slick footwear.  Trust me, especially when you’re using retention aid, floors can get slick.

 

Yes, those are my tentacles.

You should also wear shorts so that you can stay as dry as possible.

You need a mold and deckle, which I kinda threw these together to see if I could make it work.  It was an experiement for my papermaking class that didn’t go, but it’s good to know because it means that I can make them quickly and cheaply (or have students make their own in class).

 

It’s funny that it took me so long to do this since, when I first took papermaking, we did, in fact, make specialized deckles.

I just kinda–forgot about it, I guess.

In my defense, this was like 6/7 years ago.

And, then there’s water and containers and pulp and pulling paper and pressing paper and doing inclusions (if you want) and laminating and ALL THE THINGS.

 

Once the paper’s dry, you have a couple of options.  I wanted my paper to have a bit more translucency, which is difficult to see in the images, so I bees-waxed them and polyurethaned them.

 

 

 

 

 

So–that’s it?  That’s a lot of what I’ve been doing?  Not all of it, but a lot of it.  I’ve also been planning classes and drawing in Procreate and starting some larger scale embroidered pieces (which don’t look like anything currently), and as always, I’ve been writing for The Rainbow Hub.

It’s seriously the best job ever.

So, yep.  That’s what you missed in Night Vale.

Courage.

inside the tentacle-made studios (the ARTgarage edition)

So, yeah, before I do anything else, y’all have got to go check out the dance sequence in last week’s episode of Bunheads.  Just, go to minute mark 39 and watch.

I’ll wait.

So.  What’d y’all think?

Leave your thoughts in the comments, and we can all have a nice chat about it.

Okay, yes, real art-blog business.  Right.  A real post.

*tra lala la la la la la*

The ADHD is bad today.  Sorry about that.

*insert segue here*

So, my studio at the ARTgarage is the size of a sneeze.  Totally.  Like, if I take Vincent (my spinning wheel) in there with me, there’s about a foot to a foot-and-a-half of space in front and behind me with maybe 8 inches on either side.*

*I don’t know how accurate those measurements are since I have never actually measured when I was in my studio spinning.  That’d be weird.

This is the view into my studio coming through another Ahliah Zia Shashonah’s studio.  We actually confuse people because our aesthetics are similar enough that it looks like one big studio.  It’s not, though.

Most of the work that I do in this studio is pastel work, spinning, ink, bookmaking, sewing, or the occasionally layer media over monoprint (this is still a developing thing for me).  I get a lot done in a small space and have some lovely display space.

…it also means that I actually have to talk to people on occasion.  If I only worked in the tentacle-made studio at Hemlock House, then I’d probably never speak to anyone other than you lovely people.

Introvert=me.

My work desk with some of my as-yet-photographed Nothing(s) hanging about and some of my hides series.

I like used atlases too, if anyone has any that they’d like to send my way.  Or old books.  Or sheet music.  Or, ya know, stuff.

Panning to the right, you can see my Ur-bag taking up valuable floor space, my craptastic storage (that’s gotten a bit better, admittedly, since I got a little storage cart that goes underneath the work table), and art displayed from the unnamed friends series, the taxonomy series, the impression portraits, and spindle’s work, Zellandine’s denouement series.

Further to the right is more of my storage, my ARTgarage pastel box (I have one in the tentacle-made studios too), and more of my art:  the scrump series, the chimera series, the unnamed friends series, more of the spindle’s work series, and some random book arts stuff.

And, lastly, my easel, which I have had since I was a teenager, with the first piece in the beast series still on it.

So, yeah, that’s my sneeze-sized studio.  Come by the ARTgarage, and you might see me in it.

And, since we’re on the ARTgarage and me haunting the place on a semi-regular basis, I’m teaching some classes for them this fall:  3 drop spindle workshops (Sept. 13th, Oct, 13th, and Nov. 13th) and a 6 books in 6 hours bookmaking class (Sept. 29th and 30th).  So, if any of those are interesting to you, let me know or check out the classes section of the ARTgarage website.

Mine are not currently listed because they were just turned in last week, but yeah, they’ll be there soon.  I hope.

Courage.

inside the tentacle-made studios (Shawano edition)

So, I recently cleaned and reorganized my studio, and I thought that y’all might like to see one of the places that I work in.

This is my little work area with my glass for monoprinting and my giant cutting matte for paper and fabric and some of my inspiration–thingies.  Y’all can also see piercing cradle for bookmaking, an as-yet incomplete plushie piece, and some of my books.

There’s a lot of books.

And the best lamp ever.

To the left of my work area is my spinning wheel Vincent and my weird little cart with all of its little drawers.

Behind Vincent, you can just see my pastel box peaking through.

By-the-by, the table I use for my work area was my great-grandma’s.  My dad has told me stories about being small and hiding underneath it at his grandma’s house.

A close-up of the shelving unit to the left of my work area.

A close-up of (some of) my books.  Did I mention that there are a lot more?

My pretty, pretty lamp–and my Dress of Storage.

My sewing area-cum-staging area for my easel, which is to the right (no image for some reason).  I just found this old-school desk at Goodwill for $2.  I kid you not:  $2.

*inserts Better Off Dead “I want my $2!” reference*

Also, a couple of my fungoid owlets.

My (craptastic) dress-form and my freshly painted photowall…plus some stuff that needs to be redistributed around Hemlock House and the studio.  This is all to the right of the sewing area.

My nascent metal-working area.  I’m still working on getting it all set up.  It’s too the right of the sewing area.

The shelves where all my fiber stuff hangs out.  This is too the left of the sewing area.

The white bag has kozo in it waiting to be boiled and used.  Oh!  And check out my pretty cricket loom! <–I’m still working on the weaving-thing.

More books.  More fiber.  Toolboxes (bookmaking and regular toolbox).  Gesso and adhesives.  Rolls of paper and per-streatched canvases.  All to the left of Vincent and my main work area.

The big red-brown thing is my flammables cabinet.

In the distance, you can see the garage door of the studio ’cause my studio is a garage.  But!  It has a drain in the floor.

This visual jumble is my not-organized section–really, it’s more organized than it looks; it’s just that the water-heater and the furnace are right there.

The butcher’s block is actually my paper-making surface with my book/paper-press  sitting on top; it also has all of my paper-making stuff and fiber dyes hiding inside of it.  Hidden behind it is my double dry-sink, which is currently filled with alpaca and wool that needs to be processed.  You can also see my woefully inadequate sink and my studio spotlights.

A random piece based on 28 Weeks Later that has lived in several of my studios.

A piece that I’ve been working on:  zombie!Santa (in-progress).  Good for decoration from Samhain until Yule.

So, yeah, that’s pretty much  my crazy studio–except for the ginormous fabric bin, the Supply Room, and the as-yet not-working lathe.

Courage.

“Behold! For I am really not kidding!” <-Yes, I know I used it yesterday…

But, I think that it bears repeating, especially since I just finished The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore. Evidently, someone somewhere is making a The Stupidest Angel movie. For realz. o.O

 

I kinda want to know what crack he’s on, because it’s obviously the really good Metals Crack*, but I kinda want my own stash.

 

*spiiiiiiiiiiiiiiins and tra lala las*

 

So, I am feeling better–or, at least, I’m not going to die and have made it out of Hemlock House for my date with the Illustrious Miss Sara–and, therefore, I am owing y’all a post (or seven). <–Okay, this was like 8 hours ago.  WordPress was being stupid, and I lost my post.  Twice.

 

Asshats.

 

Sorry, I have much anger today.

 

 

 

Okay, it may not be much of a post since, between SOPA/PIPA last week and feeling like I was going to die this week, there hasn’t be a whole lotta thinking going on in my little squid head.

 

There was some thinking that Umberto Eco has some pretentious paranoia going on and an ugly, deep-seeded love/hate/lust thing going on with the Templars and all the numerous other secret societies that are scarpering about the planet. <–I just finished reading Foucault’s Pendulum too.

 

 

 

Nota Bene: The focus of my studies in Classics were Religion (specifically Mystery Religions), Mythology, and Art and my Senior Thesis in History was on Early Modern Mysticism, so I actually am really interested in these sorts of phenomenon. I also really like certain aspects of the book like Belbo’s fictionalized historicism of Kelley and the pages and pages and pages of really interesting history. There were just other parts that made me go “Really?” like the 3-4 chapters of false ending.

 

Can we say The Return of the King here?

 

Yes, I really do read multiple books at once; it’s easier when one has the attention span of a gnat.

 

*whistles*

 

So, before I got completely side-tracked by Eco and Moore, I was going to say that I have loads of nifty pictures by way of a pseudo-blog post today.

 

‘Cause, even ill, I’m completely bee-like.

 

But just a few. *feels stingy today*

 

full tunnel book

 

A tunnel book sample that I made to go with the physical advertising of my bookmaking class at the ARTgarage. I’m rather fond of it, although the picture kinda sucks. <–My photo area is still down due to a massive reorganization after ‘Lain moved out.

 

I also made a folded structure book sample to display. This is a picture of it in process; it’s done and on display, but I haven’t taken a picture of it yet.

 

sculpture book

 

I’ve been making some Kindle covers. This is mine and The Husband’s respectively.

 

question bird

 

hello owl

 

The handmade insult series is also continuing apace.

 

stupid head

 

Did I mention that I’ve also learned to perform basic knitting? <–No picture, just a random question.

 

And check out the amazing old china I found at Goodwill.

 

tea

 

It wasn’t a complete set, but it had the tiniest tea cups and a large-ish bowl and a plate. I <3 it like y’all wouldn’t believe.

 

Classes at the ARTgarage:

 

Storybeads:

  • Saturday, January 14th: basic beading structures & open studio
  • Saturday, January 21st: fiber incorporation & open studio
  • Saturday, January 28th: pendant structures & open studio
  • Saturday, February 4th: wire work & open studio

 

When: Saturdays, January 14th-February 4th, 10 am-12 pm

Where: the ARTgarage

Cost: $25 includes use of tools and basic materials (sign-up for 3 classes and take the 4th free!)

 

Bookmaking:

  • Saturday, January 14th: Instabooks
  • Saturday, January 21st: Concertina books
  • Saturday, January 28th: Pamphlets
  • Saturday,February 4th: Japanese Stab Binding
  • Saturday, February 11th: Codex books
  • Saturday, February 18th: Tunnel books
  • Saturday, February 25th: Flag books
  • Saturday, March 3rd: Carousel books
  • Saturday, March 10th: Folded structures
  • Saturday, March 17th: Altered books

 

When: Saturdays, January 14th-March 17th, 1-3 pm

Where: the ARTgarage

Cost: $60 for first session, $40 for each following session

 Papermaking:

  • Saturday, February 11th: History, equipment, initial pulls
  • Saturday, February 18th: Cotton pull
  • Saturday, February 25th: Abaca/flax pull
  • Saturday, March 3rd: Kozo, dyeing, and forming
  • Saturday, March 10th: Inclusion papers
  • Saturday, March 17th: Pulp-painting and collage pages

 

When: Saturdays, February 11th-March 17th, 9-12 am

Where: the ARTgarage

Cost: $150 for all six classes

 

Mixed Media:

 

Possible projects include 10-layer drawings, altered books, and assemblage and techniques such as photo-transfer.

  • Saturday, March 24th
  • Saturday, March 31st
  • Saturday, April 7th
  • Saturday, April 14th
  • Saturday, April 21st
  • Saturday, April 28th

 

When: Saturdays, March 24th-April 28th, 10-12 am

Where: the ARTgarage

Cost: $150 for all six classes

 

Sculpture:

 

Possible projects include mini-installation, guerrilla fiber, fiber art, assemblage, wearable art, and/or environmental art.

  • Saturday, March 24th
  • Saturday, March 31st
  • Saturday, April 7th
  • Saturday, April 14th
  • Saturday, April 21st
  • Saturday, April 28th

 

When: Saturdays, March 24th-April 28th, 1-3 pm

Where: the ARTgarage

Cost: $150 for all six classes

 

*”Metals Crack” was a joke when I was an undergraduate.  I took several Metals classes, and there were some people in them that should just not have been allowed near fire.  We kept telling them that Metals Crack was the really good crack that caused you to grow an extra eye in the top of your head.  Scarily, a few of them seemed to believe us.  *le SIGH*

 

Courage.

Teaching Schedule at the ARTgarage

As promised, my teaching calendar for the ARTgarage.

 

…so, ya know, y’all can come and take classes with me.

 

‘Cause all the cool kids are doin’ it.

 

*whistles*

 

I’m scheduled to teach five classes at the ARTgarage:  Storybeads, Bookmaking, Papermaking, Mixed Media, and Sculpture.  I’m going to list the class dates categorically so that y’all can just *waves hand* skip to the class that you might be interested in…’cause that makes sense to me.

 

Storybeads:

  • Saturday, January 14th:  basic beading structures & open studio
  • Saturday, January 21st:  fiber incorporation & open studio
  • Saturday, January 28th:  pendant structures & open studio
  • Saturday, February 4th:  wire work & open studio

 

When:    Saturdays, January 14th-February 4th, 10 am-12 pm

Where:   the ARTgarage

Cost:      $25 includes use of tools and basic materials (sign-up for 3 classes and take the 4th free!)

Bookmaking:

  • Saturday, January 14th:  Instabooks
  • Saturday, January 21st:  Concertina books
  • Saturday, January 28th:  Pamphlets
  • Saturday,February 4th:  Japanese Stab Binding
  • Saturday, February 11th:  Codex books
  • Saturday, February 18th:  Tunnel books
  • Saturday, February 25th:  Flag books
  • Saturday, March 3rd:  Carousel books
  • Saturday, March 10th:  Folded structures
  • Saturday, March 17th:  Altered books

 

When:    Saturdays, January 14th-March 17th, 1-3 pm

Where:   the ARTgarage

Cost:      $60 for first session, $40 for each following session

Papermaking:

  • Saturday, February 11th:  History, equipment, initial pulls
  • Saturday, February 18th:  Cotton pull
  • Saturday, February 25th:  Abaca/flax pull
  • Saturday, March 3rd:  Kozo, dyeing, and forming
  • Saturday, March 10th:  Inclusion papers
  • Saturday, March 17th:  Pulp-painting and collage pages

 

When:    Saturdays, February 11th-March 17th, 9-12 am

Where:   the ARTgarage

Cost:      $150 for all six classes

Mixed Media:

 

Possible projects include 10-layer drawings, altered books, and assemblage and techniques such as photo-transfer.

  • Saturday, March 24th
  • Saturday, March 31st
  • Saturday, April 7th
  • Saturday, April 14th
  • Saturday, April 21st
  • Saturday, April 28th

 

When:    Saturdays, March 24th-April 28th, 10-12 am

Where:   the ARTgarage

Cost:      $150 for all six classes

Sculpture:

 

Possible projects include mini-installation, guerrilla fiber, fiber art, assemblage, wearable art, and/or environmental art.

  • Saturday, March 24th
  • Saturday, March 31st
  • Saturday, April 7th
  • Saturday, April 14th
  • Saturday, April 21st
  • Saturday, April 28th

 

When:    Saturdays, March 24th-April 28th, 1-3 pm

Where:   the ARTgarage

Cost:      $150 for all six classes

 

I also have been working on a tunnel book on and off all day; it’s currently in about seven pieces awaiting assembly.

 

And, if y’all don’t get snowpacalypsed in, there’s an opening at the ARTgarage tomorrow for the 1st Quarter Artists.  <–If we get snowpacalyped, I may not be going. *shrugs* So goes it.

 

Courage.

what are your thoughts? CVs and artist resumes and other things

I’ve been working on my CV again (which means, I’ll have to update the blog’s info again *sigh*) for a couple of reasons.

 

The first is that where The Husband teaches is in need of people that can teach art and know about Art History. <–I’ve been helping him flesh out their library with Art History texts as well as guest lecturing for his Humanities classes:  how the 20th century went collectively wacko at once, what caused it, and what it did to the art.  How’s that for a title of a book?

 

Have I mentioned how much I truly and deeply love the 20th century art history textbooks Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism, Vol. 1: 1900-1944 and Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism, Vol. 2:  1945 to the present? It’s set up by year, which I know sounds tedious, but that means that everything that ended up influencing a particular year is accounted for in the previous years as well as the chapter of that year.  It’s as close as one can get to reliving that time period.  Also, totally co-authored/co-edited by Yve-Alain Bois, Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, Hal Foster, and Rosalind Krauss.

 

There’s a weird kinda happy place in my heart.

 

So, yeah, I’m supposed to finish it up and send it off to the school’s head hunter (in a good way).  Who knows, I might end up teaching 2-D design and art classes for the Elementary Education kids.

 

That could be kinda fun.  Alyson would be so proud.

 

The other reason, for those of you that don’t know, is that I have an interview to teach paper-making at one of the local technical colleges on the 15th. <–The short version is that I had talked to Miss Carrie, our Education Director at the ARTgarage, about possibly teaching paper-making in the Spring, and she mentioned it to the site manager/headhunter (again, in a really good way) for this technical college, and he asked if I’d like to interview for an adjunct faculty spot.

 

Evidently, they’ve been trying to get someone “young and fun” to get these classes off the ground finally.  I don’t know if I’m young or fun, but I do have an inordinate amount of fun playing with paper and paper-pulp and making sculptural objects out of it. <–This has directly lead to a sick love of polyurethane.

 

So–yeah–CV, me, and art-job interviews.  Eep with a capital EEP.

 

But, this has all been getting me to think about what we, as artists, and we, as educators, put on our CVs and the order in which we put it on their.

 

When I was a tutor in the Writing Center at NIU and at Kishwaukee College (and, yes, I do realize the irony in my cracktastic, informal blog being written by someone with a Literature degree and ~6 years worth of Writing Center experience), I learned that, sometimes, it’s better to put the relevant experience that’s going to qualify you for the job at the top instead of your education; whereas, in academic CVs, you always put your education first.

 

As artists, it seems like we’d put our education first, but a lot of us have very peculiar educations *raises tentacle* and self-educations *again, raises tentacle*, so our show might be a more appropriate opener.

 

But, if you’re applying for a teaching position, it would again be education because that’s the way the academic world works, right?  And what about published works?  I’m odd and have had my art published as well as a couple academic articles.  Should I separate them or leave them together? <–Again, I’m weird, and I think that they should all be together because they’re coming from similar places in my brain.  Who knows if that makes sense to anyone else on the planet, yeah?

 

I know how I did mine (and it has been Husband, also a Writing Center tutor, approved).

 

What are your thoughts, my lovelies?  How do y’all structure your CVs, resumes, and other job-getting ephemera?

 

Leave comments, musings, and anything else that you’d like.  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Courage.