Stuff and things.

So, I’ve been ridiculously busy with The New Job (I’m three weeks in now).

It’s been nutty.  For realz.

So, today’s images and stuff are a bit older (the images are like a month old).

This is part of my insult series–one of my first embroidery projects.  It’s kinda sent me into more thoroughly constructed embroidery projects.

A couple of my fungoid owlets.  They’re numbered and everything.

And this is a detail of a 12-foot long upcycled, braided, silk and wool and satin multi-purpose—thing.  There’s nothing that you can’t do with it!

Except fit it into a small bag.  It’s frikkin’ huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge.

Okay, now that there have been pictures of pretties (and there are a ton more where these came from), an announcement.

PSA:  Thursday, May 17th, is the Opening of the ARTgarage’s Second Quarter Show.

Come and seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

I’m demo-ing, yo.

Waffle is very happy.

Courage.

GROUP SHOW!!!

So, yeah, I mentioned a couple of weeks ago that I was asked to participate in a group show called CircusNerve.

I delivered my pieces last Friday:  a 24×48 in. painting and a clutch of fungoid owlets.

I’M VERY EXCITED!

unnamed friends: pyramid-bird
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
acrylic on canvas
2012

I don’t really have an proper pictures of my fungoid owlets (YET!) except for these.  They’re representative of the series if not completely encompassing of the options.

unnamed friends: fungoid owlet (1/1; for artist's trade)
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
fiber
2011
unnamed friends: fungoid owlets (4/100)
Katrina ('Trie) Blasingame
fiber
2011

So, yeah, an idea of what I’ve got in the show.  But, I am only one of many, many artists.

Y’all will have to come and see!

Also, if y’all need something to do this Thursday night, come by the ARTgarage for Gallery Nite.

I’m spinning.

Seriously, I’m spinning yarn.  It’s kinda wild.

Courage and cake.

 

I’ve been being productive, all the live-long day.

And the dwarfs have been sent off to work.

 

*is all Gilmore-Girl-y with my references*

 

This is a very studio-heavy post ’cause I’ve been being all studio-productive-y this year! *\o/*

 

Part of that productivity has been playing with dye. I’m calling it Experiments in Dye Land.

 

Since I learned to spin in 2011 (Thanks, Miss Hel!), I am now trying my tentacles at acid dyeing wool.  <–I'm experimenting with some wool that I purchased at the Farmer's Market this summer from the Embarrass Carding Mill.

 

Yes, there is a town not-too far from me called Embarrass, pronounced like “I’m embarrassed by.” <–I'm not kidding.  Embarrass.  Really.

 

*hands*

 

So, acid dyeing protein fibers actually requires that the fiber and the dye be simmered for a bit of time in a set-up that I don't have (and don't have the money to supply), and I don't have a canning rig (yet!) to borrow from, so I kinda–improvised–it.  <–From instructions similar to these instructions from Dharma Trading Company.

 

*IMPROVISES*

 

These are the results:

 

acid dyed (with procion dye) wool 1

 

From left to right: Jet Black (which totally didn’t come out black; it came out grey and acid green, which is rather shiny), Black Cherry, and Turquoise.

 

acid dyed (with procion dye) wool 2

 

From left to right: Turquoise (second hank of it), China Red, and Deep Orange.

 

I think that, for my first try, it didn’t came out too badly.

 

And, since I had the dyeing stuff out, I thought that I’d dye a bunch of white t-shirts that I had siting about.

 

kelly green, teal, and turquoise procion dye crossed grid

 

kelly green, teal, and turquoise procion dye burst

 

Both of these shirts were dyed with a mixture of Kelly Green, Teal, and Turquoise.

 

turquoise and jet black procion dye

 

turquoise procion dye in a grid pattern

 

The shirt on the top is Jet Black and Turquoise; on the bottom, Turquoise.

 

china red procion dye burst

 

china red procion dye fragments

 

Both of these are dyed with China Red.

 

burgundy & deep orange procion dye in a burst

 

This one is dyed with Burgundy and Deep Orange.

 

Of course, I managed to injure myself while tyeing-up the shirts.

 

*eyeroll heard ’round the world*

 

What can I say? I’m accident prone.

 

*trips over a piece of paper*

 

…I’m okay.

 

*tra lala la la*

 

I’m currently wearing the Jet Black/Turquoise shirt. *twiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrls*

 

I’ve also been working on a corollary series to my unnamed friends series; it’s currently untitled, but I’ve been referring to it as echo-spectre.

 

The key words/conceptual framework behind them is sorta looking like this: homonculus, daguerreotype, shimmer, echo, Book of Pressed Fairies, Platonic Ideal, shuggoths, Lovecraft, graffiti, Andy Warhol, pop art, unnamed friends, taxonomy, doodle, butterfly, and organic.

 

singular echo of fungoid owlet

 

owlets in the mist

 

echo-spectre set

 

echo-spectre bird-blobs

 

echo-spectre algae primate

 

I also have a critter–unnamed friends: pop-tart Monday.

 

unnamed friends:  pop-tart monday

 

So, yeah, except for the two echo-spectre-owlet panels, all of this has been completed in 2012.

 

*is an awesome squid of awesomeness*

 

I’m going to posting my class schedule at the ARTgarage soon, though I’m teaching a Bookmaking class and a Storybead class this Saturday if y’all need something to do and are in the area.

 

*bounces off to clean the studio and do more work*

 

Courage.

IQ’s Fall Art Reception and Fourth Quarter Art at the ARTgarage

So, I’m not really ready to be think-y about Branding yet; I’m still trying to figure out what it means for me specifically and what it will look like in practice.  I could totally parse it out here, but I really don’t want to subject y’all to that sort of babble–and it totally would be disconnected babble!–so, instead, owls!

 

Fungoid owlets, to be specific.

 

And my Fourth Quarter exhibit at the ARTgarage.

 

And, an Art Reception at IQ’s!

 

So, I’m going to begin at the end and work back through to the beginning.  Cause I’m tired.  And it makes sense in my head.  Have I mentioned I’m tired?

 

The Fall Art Reception and Open Mic at IQ’s in Green Bay.  It’s totally a Heather Peterman gig, but she totally shares her stage with other artists.  She invited me to come and play with everyone else–to the point I’m on the flyer. *hands*  Heather is totally awesome and makes beautiful art and bags (I have one; it’s my favorite bag!).

 

Fall Art Reception and Open Mic at IQ's Green Bay, October 6, 2011

 

Actually, she had invited me to participate in the last Art Reception, but I wasn’t feeling ready to be out with my art and potentially not sell anything sell my art.  <–Have I mentioned that I have raging insecurity?  And a height-related inferiority complex?  *whistles*

 

So, yeah, come out to IQ’s on Saturday and see a bunch of fantastic art–maybe even buy a few things–and listen to a lot of good music. The Fall Art Reception coincides with an Open Mic. We might even get The Husband up there to play!

 

*and we segue over to here in a non-awkward self-aware fashion because I don’t have a good transitional idea right now*

 

Sometimes, ya really just have to go for the obvious transitions, ya know?

 

I finished putting up my Fourth Quarter Exhibit at the ARTgarage. Here are some pictures.

 

2011 Fourth Quarter Art Exhibit at the ARTgarage

 

detail

 

From left to right:  unnamed friends:  AT-AT ($140), unnamed friends:  sheepapillar ($150), and unnamed friends:  twitter-tail ($130).

 

detail

 

Still talking about the framed pieces, from left to right:  unnamed friends:  squid attacked by bird-blob ($150) and unnamed friends:  uni ($130).

 

detail

 

Sculptures, from left to right:  unnamed owlets:  fungoid owlets (1-3/100; small owlets $65, medium owlets $85), unnamed friends:  from the 100 acre wood ($1200), and unnamed friends:  fungoid owlets (5-7/100; small owlet $65, medium owlet $85, large owlet $120).

 

The unnamed friends: fungoid owlet artist doll edition is going well. I’ve already sold one–mind, it was sold to Miss ‘Lain, and she always buys my stuff. She’s my own personal patron.

 

Here are the little buggers (in close-up!) so far:

 

unnamed friends:  fungoid owlets (1-3/100)

 

unnamed friends:  fungoid owlet (4/100)

 

This little guy was #4 in the edition.

 

unnamed friends:  fungoid owlets (5-7/100)

 

And, I have 10 more owlet carcasses waiting to be stuffed for Saturday.

 

Have I mentioned that I really like not being afraid of my sewing machine anymore?

 

So, here’s the currently updated calendar:

Story Beads:  Beading to Heal–September 30th    $30.00

The ARTgarage has a class cooperative with St. Vinny’s, and this class is being offered through that program.  This class is also totally based upon one that I took with Lisa Kay a couple of years ago.  She’s totally as awesome as you’d think she’d be winning a Fulbright.  Share the love!

 

So, I had one person signed up for this class, but we had such a good time, I think!  Definitely going to see about doing this again in the Spring–maybe as more of a series of “come and learn; come back to hang out and work together!”

 

“Visualizing Your Hopes and Dreams”:  An Art Night for Freedom House–October 3rd, 6-8 pm

It’s basically an art class being taught for the families that Freedom House helps out.

 

Kelly and I had about 10 people (though 2 were too small to do more than run around) plus Freedom House’s coordinator-lady Robyn (who is totally awesome).  We all had a good time, one student tried drawing for the first time in her life, and I made a new friend.

 

Studio Tour–October 7th, 12-6 at the ARTgarage

It’s really Chris Style’s studio tour, but all the ARTgarage studio artists were invited to join the fun.  This tour happens the 8th and 9th also, but I’m only going to be there the 7th and the 9th.

 

Bay Area Watercolor Artists Opening–October 7th, 5-8 at the ARTgarage

Not necessarily my art scene, but ya know, I’m still gonna be supportive!

 

 

IQ’s Fall Art Reception–October 8th

3-8 pm at IQ’s Bar 2105 University Ave., Green Bay

 

Studio Tour–October 9th, 12-5 at the ARTgarage

Same sitch, different day.

 

4th Quarter Artists Opening Reception AND the first Artists’ Demo-ing Night (hip name yet to be chosen)–October 13th

5-8 pm at the ARTgarage.  The Artists’ Demo-ing Night is something new that we’re trying, so if you’re an artist in the Green Bay area, come to Demo Night!  We all aren’t ARTgarage artists either, and we’re willing to share our windfall awesomeness!

 

Japanese Stab Binding:  Books to Heal–October 14th    $30.00

Also, a St. Vinny’s class.

 

Artist Books:  A Bookmaking Workshop–November 11th-12th    $150.00

Bookmaking techniques and artist books! \o/

 

Artists’ Demo-ing Night–November 17th

Same sitch (yes, I did use “sitch”) as the other one.

 

Artist Dolls–November 18th-19th    $150.00

Really, this is ‘Lain’s gig; I’m just co-teaching.

 

Black Friday Mixed Media for Kids Class–November 25th

Co-taught with the fabulous Miss Carrie.  Bring your kids to be babysat to learn about and make mixed media art while you get some peace and quiet some Yule/Christmas/Kwanzaa/Hanukkah/Saturnalia/insert-your-holy-day-here shopping done.

 

Artists’ Demo-ing Night (I really hope we come up with a better title soon.)–Decemeber 15th, 5-8 pm

This Demo Night happens during the ARTgarage’s annual Holiday Sale/Show, so it’s a double header.

 

Miss ‘Lain is also teaching a couple of other classes that I’m kinda helping out with (Mostly so that I can take the class without paying for it!  Don’t tell!).

Circuit Bending 101–October 28th    $60.00

Puppetry–December 2nd and 9th    $150

 

So, that about covers everything…okay, probably not, but it’s all I’ve got right now.

 

Courage.

*waffles*

I think today’s post is going to be drive-by-y and preview-y–mostly, because I’m still the sickliest squid to ever be sickly (i.e., I have the Cold That Will Not Die And Makes Me Want To Expire).  <–It’s a wordy cold; it really is–ask The Husband and PA/Minion.  They’ve had to listen to me be up half the night for the last week with the worst cough ever.

 

*is a miserable whiny bug*

 

So, understandably, it’s been a bit difficult to do think-y things.  The most impressive things I think I’ve managed during this cold is reading The Court of the Air by Stephen Hunt and working on an edition of unnamed friends:  fungoid owlet artist dolls.  <–The proto-type of which went to my most excellent friend, Miss Hel, as an artist trade.

 

unnamed friends:  owlet (sketch)

 

unnamed friends fungoid owlets

 

Now, the edition is coming along just fine. I’m up to four of the little owlets–using a sewing machine? so much quicker than hand-sewing, and I think I’m getting pretty okay at it–but I’d like to get a couple of more done before Friday, which is the Change of Quarter at the ARTgarage. That means that (theoretically) all the artists switch out their art for new art so that the gallery is full of new art.

 

 

It doesn’t always happen that way, but that is the theory.

 

The Court of the Air was–okay. Too much “it’s the end of the world,” and too little “cheesecake, jellybean, boom.” There are so many buried popular culture/popular literature references going on in there that I could only say that at least Hunt is well-read.

 

Really, every other page, I had any combination of “Really? Are you really doing this? Are you really going to moralize quite so obviously? Are you really going to be that awful with the punning?” responses going on.

 

There were very few things that felt unexpected (or were expected, but I was actually pleased about the presence of the expected). I wanted way more of the Steammen Free State ’cause, really, they were the most interesting characters for me; I wanted more character development because, seriously, the entire novel is about endings: the end of family, the end of security, the end of reality (quite literally), the end of previous identity, the end of life. There was only really one moment of “beginning” that happened for me, and that, of course, had to do with the steammen.

 

I wanted the world to actually be developed rather than all of these really, potentially great ideas being thrown together with little-to-no explanation or history.

 

But that’s just me. It could totally be someone else’s cuppa; it just wasn’t really mine. Your mileage may vary.

 

So, yeah, I veered of there into an elitist literature rant, I think. That happens on occasion.

 

What I’ve been thinking about is Branding. How artists brand themselves and their work, and how that branding can be extended to promotional/networking pieces like business card, website, yada.

 

 

I’m working on it, I swear.

 

Okay, so I’ll be think-y about Branding for the next week and get back to y’all on how that’s working out for me–probably, with references since I’m still Research Girl (no Buffy references intended).

 

And, so the calendar is delineated where everyone can find it (I’m not all-that-pleased with the inserted Google calendar):

 

Story Beads:  Beading to Heal–September 30th    $30.00

The ARTgarage has a class cooperative with St. Vinny’s, and this class is being offered through that program.  This class is also totally based upon one that I took with Lisa Kay a couple of years ago.  She’s totally as awesome as you’d think she’d be winning a Fulbright.  Share the love!

 

“Visualizing Your Hopes and Dreams”:  An Art Night for Freedom House–October 3rd, 6-8 pm

It’s basically an art class being taught for the families that Freedom House helps out.

 

IQ’s Fall Art Reception–October 8th

3-8 pm at IQ’s Bar 2105 University Ave., Green Bay

 

4th Quarter Artists Opening Reception AND the first Artists’ Demo-ing Night (hip name yet to be chosen)–October 13th

5-8 pm at the ARTgarage.  The Artists’ Demo-ing Night is something new that we’re trying, so if you’re an artist in the Green Bay area, come to Demo Night!  We all aren’t ARTgarage artists either, and we’re willing to share our windfall awesomeness!

 

Japanese Stab Binding:  Books to Heal–October 14th    $30.00

Also, a St. Vinny’s class.

 

Artist Books:  A Bookmaking Workshop–November 11th-12th    $150.00

Bookmaking techniques and artist books! \o/

 

Artists’ Demo-ing Night–November 17th

Same sitch (yes, I did use “sitch”) as the other one.

 

Artist Dolls–November 18th-19th    $150.00

Really, this is ‘Lain’s gig; I’m just co-teaching.

 

Black Friday Mixed Media for Kids Class–November 25th

Co-taught with the fabulous Miss Carrie.  Bring your kids to be babysat to learn about and make mixed media art while you get some peace and quiet some Yule/Christmas/Kwanzaa/Hanukkah/Saturnalia/insert-your-holy-day-here shopping done.

 

Artists’ Demo-ing Night (I really hope we come up with a better title soon.)–Decemeber 15th, 5-8 pm

This Demo Night happens during the ARTgarage’s annual Holiday Sale/Show, so it’s a double header.

 

Miss ‘Lain is also teaching a couple of other classes that I’m kinda helping out with (Mostly so that I can take the class without paying for it!  Don’t tell!).

Circuit Bending 101–October 28th    $60.00

Puppetry–December 2nd and 9th    $150

 

Courage.

on this episode of squid’s endeavors in artland…

For those of you that read my blog on a (semi-)regular basis, then you’ll remember that I’ve been working on a piece for The Fiction Project.  For those of you that follow my Twitter feed or follow me on Facebook, you’ll know that I sent my piece in on Friday.

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So.  The Fiction Project.  Completed.

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Yay?

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I promised pictures (I’m always promising something, it seems), so without further ado (oh, come on!  more ado!  ado ado ado!), the bestiary of unnamed friends:  a travelogue.  From front cover to back cover and everything in between.

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The front cover.  Nothing terribly special.

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Some nice paper (hello, paper habit, how I’ve missed you so!).

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Nifty scrapbooking placard things.

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Hand-written title (there’s a load of handwriting in this thing, just to warn y’all).

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Obnoxious pink embroidery thread for binding purposes.

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Typically garish, ugly (in a good way) squidness.

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And, then?  The interior cover.

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*bum bum BUUUUUUUUUUUUUM*

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More nifty paper, but there’s the beginning of the narrative (sorta).

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The block of text is the definition of “bestiary” and reads

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bestiary n. pl. bes-ti-ar-ries

1.  a medieval collection of stories providing physical and allegorical descriptions of real or imaginary animals along with an interpretation of the moral significance each animal was thought to embody.  a number of misconceptions relating to natural history were preserved in the popular accents.

2.  a modern version of such a collection.

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The wee plushie ninja in the corner is our guide through all this craziness.  Just call him Virgil.

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Once the page is turned, this is what happens.

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In case it’s hard to read (I’ve got kinda sketchy handwriting sometimes, and I have the original notes and can totally blow the picture up to ungodly proportions), it says, without the formating:

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Once upon a time

[always the best

way to start

a story]

I

awoke

to

find

a little creature

[let’s not kid–

it looked like

a plushie-ninja]

sitting beside

my

head

and he said to me,

[Come with me

if you want

to live]

“It’ll be

fun.

I swear.”

He blinked

[plinked]

“Come with me.”

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Yeah, I like my L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poetry.  What of it?

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Upon opening the panels of the books, the next part of the narrative is revealed.

*

*

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This all reads linearly as

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and I said “Yes, I’ll go with you, Alice.  Down the rabbit hole we’ll go.  Go to a land which is unseen by all.

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The note on the squid’s head reads

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this is me  I’m a squid  don’t ask  it doesn’t make any sense least of all to me  xxoo, ‘Trie

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And, then, after all of that, is the full panoramic view of the unnamed friends in the bestiary.

*

*

I’ll save you all the individual up-close images, but I will give you what the words say.

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Starting with the dragonfly-ish critter and moving down and around.

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They are tiny (it’s relative) blobs of hot air, dirigible of dragonfly elegance.  Pretension is their stock and trade.

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They, ginormous in their iteration, glide through mangrove swamps filled with slinking crocodilians.  They prey upon the unsuspecting denizens, enveloping them in their yearning, bilious membranes.

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Down the tower, it reads:

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architecturally unique

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a living building

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a stone’s conception of time is so different from (h)ours–measured in milenia rather than moments–cricket-reduction means so much less ( like Eos’ mate).  Just another half-inch tectonic shift.

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The owlets read:

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grown-up in collective of frog-eyed complacency–to eat, eat, eaten, to be eaten–hiding in plain sight (unobservant though it may be)–feathered, leafy immobility helpless in the forest–spitting venomed wit at any who pass

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The blob-y blurp reads:

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*blurp*  *blurp*  *blurp*  *blurp*  *blurp*  *blurp*

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a bottom dwelling creature bound in parasitic symbiosis with fungoid ground owls–protections and food all in one with nary (a squirrel upon my face) any reciprocation–a polite than you as it is ushered out the door.  Again, exiled from violet grace.

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The pheasant-head springy sprong reads:

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Like Byatt’s “The Thing in the Forest,” these creatures literally move through their environments–slinking, slithering, pulsating, and subdividing.

*

Like cellular mitosis but with pain.

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Yet, do we know that there is no pain in cellular mitosis?  Do the mitochondria scream when they remember that they once belonged to another entity?

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There are worlds-upon-worlds at the micro-level–how can we know?

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Maybe this little creature is but the unrecognized mitochondria of another, larger being.

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The tree stump reads:

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from the 100 acre wood  echoing “I’m alive” like the last unicorn (just go with the Kenny Logins cum Peter Beagle reference) like the last cry of the last ugly one-horned mule (so Legend made it’s way in too).  A 100 acre wood can do no more than grow, be cut down, be devoured, and fade out of memory, remaining as a remembered meal in a fungoid body.

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Up above the tree stump is the cloud sheep; it reads:

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the long lost (and misunderstood) brother of vegetable sheep–a bestiary staple–floating serene and separate, an alien never to be touched or interacted with–just gazed upon in silent wonder, autobiographical interpretations forced upon its cloud-docility.

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And the stymie, crawling up the tree stump’s side, reads:

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Up the tree down the tree waiting for its wings to grow (all sparkly and light–fairy-like in the way they shimmer) up the tree and down the tree isolated and alone all its friends have abandoned it in the mangrove swamp (really they were eaten–fed to–the bilious wings, a sacrifice to old gods with even older motivations–Jokey Smurf’s renditions of Seven.)  all because it was a little late to develop.  How sad.

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The back interior cover–

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Please note, replete with werewolf.

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The back back cover.

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More pretty paper.

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And that is the bestiary of unnamed friends:  a travelogue.  *bows*

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It, along with the rest of The Fiction Project pieces, will be touring the States and will be joining up with the tour in Seattle on June 10-12 (Poetry Jen, this is for you!) at the Form/Space Ateller.  The show will be at the Hyde Park Art Center July 14-17 all of my Chicago-land peps!

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Now!  To collapse somewhere squishy.  This was the longest post ever.  *collapses*

at The Attic–

So, I’m at The Attic, which is a coffeehouse/used bookstore near The Art Garage and is just off of Main Street.  I’m sitting beneath their art wall and thinking thinky-thoughts and killing time before I go volunteer at The Art Garage at noon.  <–See, this is me totally plugging the places I like to go.

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The opening at The Art Garage was nice.  My sculptures totally did not look like anyone else’s work, but I’m not entirely certain that not looking like anyone else’s work is a good thing.  The In-Laws the Wisconsin Edition say that it’s good.  The Husband say that it’s good.  Me?  I’m not so easily convinced.  Maybe my art is too different to be successful in this area?

I’m totally the only person who could be stressed out by this, but I always seem to need something to stress out about.  Why not stress about this, right?  At least, it’s important to me.

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But, something that I noticed at the opening that kinda worried me was that my pieces were so much more expensive than other artists’ work (mine were also far larger than anyone else’s)–and it wasn’t just because my sculptures were so much larger either.  I think that it may be the classic instance of artists under-pricing themselves.

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Now, as any artist knows, pricing one’s work is the most torturous endeavor ever.  Critics, professors, fellow artists, openings, grant writing–all of these things pail in comparison to self-pricing.  And, a lot of it seems to stem from none of use ever being told a formula for pricing.  Anything our art school mentors tells us seems to be vague and unclear.  I think the clearest I had ever heard was something along the lines of “figure how much it cost to make and multiple that by seven” (*potentially a very bad paraphrase).

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Mind you, this was not told to me.  It was told to ‘Lainy.

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‘Lain’s fair-going parents (they’re Feywood) told her something similar about pricing, but it was more like “figure out materials and time and then tack an extra 50% on it.”  Again, I potentially really misheard this.  ‘Lain, please feel free to chime in with a clarification.

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The most consistent–and probably fairest–pricing formula that I have found has been on Etsy by daniellexo with a complimentary article about discomfort in pricing by Tara Gentile of Scoutie Girl on Oh my!  Handmade Goodness, and it comes out to something like this:

Cost Price (Labor + Materials Cost) x 2 = Your Wholesale Price

Wholesale Price x 2 = Retail Price

So, basically, the price of materials and labor–how much an hour do we make as artists?  I’ve read it’s best to think in terms of $10-15/hr.  I don’t think this is terribly unreasonable since, as artists, we are highly skilled and trained practitioners.–multiplied by two equals your wholesale price, i.e., the price that people would pay if they were buying a large stock of your pieces to sell in their stores.  Multiple the wholesale price by two again and that’s the retail price, or as I like to think about it since I don’t make a whole lot of multiples (yet), the price for an individual, unique piece of art.  There was another pricing formula that I had that said that the formula should look like this:

Cost Price (Labor + Materials Cost) + 10-15% of cost price (to cover utilities used like electricity) x 2 = Your Wholesale Price

Wholesale Price x 2 = Retail Price

That 10-15% covers any utilities that you used like electricity or water–things that a lot of us take for granted in the art-making process.  I can’t really bring myself to use this second formula yet.  I barely can get myself to use the first formula, and I still end up short changing myself because I’m not used to keeping track of the amount of time or the cost of the supplies used to complete a piece.  I’m getting better, but it’s still really hard.

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The problem is that under-valuing your own art doesn’t just hurt you, but it hurts other artists because potential buyers end up with a skewed notion of what art should sell for.  And, really, accessibly art for all:  isn’t that why we all have smaller, less expensive pieces or prints?

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The formulas take a long time to get used to, and if you’re anything like me, you’re totally going to experience severe sticker-shock and thing “how can my pieces be worth this much and who in their right mind is going to buy them?”  I’m still thinking like that.

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Also, remembering that if you show at a gallery, they take a percentage of your sale to support themselves, so you’ll likely have to accept the loss from your pocketbook or you’re going to have to tack on that percentage to the existing price.  <–I haven’t been able to make myself do this yet.

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According to formula one, unnamed friends:  narwhal should cost $1200 (really, it was higher, but I knocked it down a little).  Most of that happens because it is completely hand-sewn, and that takes forever.

Please excuse the blurry photos.  The Father-In-Law took them.  *sigh*

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According to formula one, unnamed friends:  from the 100 acre wood should be $1400.  Similar reasons apply.

Yes, this is me mugging for the camera.  To give y’all an idea of scale, I’m just under 5 foot (a little more than 5 foot in the shoes I was wearing).  *refrains from blurring me out of the photo*

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So, I feel like they are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay over-priced, but I also wonder if that’s just me being insecure and small.

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I do think I need a time-clock.  A really big one that goes kachunk and ticktickticks and dings.  Make myself clock-out of the studio.

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What do y’all think my little artist-y friends?  Do you think that these formulas will help you?  Do you feel like you’re work is totally under/over-priced based upon them?

This is the piece that never ends. It goes on and on, my friend.

Okay, I’m still buried (no pun intended) in my sculpting. The unnamed friend that I’m building for the Art Garage competition has eaten around 14 lbs. of poly-fill, and I’m not done sewing him all together yet.  *laments and tears my hair*

 

Toss into the mix that I’m still building the other sculpture (tree stump-ish creature), and my hands really, really hurt.

 

One day, I will  have a sewing machine that doesn’t hate me so that I can do some of my sewing on it.  <–Okay, that really wouldn’t work with the way my critters are built, but I can dream, can’t I?

 

So, I promised some out loud thinking about ecology and world building as it relates to my conceptual process.

 

Be prepared.  It isn’t fully developed yet.  Mostly because it was a typical-for-me shower revelation.  <–My best ideas either come out of taking a shower or insomnia.  When I can get them to work together?  Pure magic.

 

I’ve always know that I was building creatures and habitats that exist in the same sort of world, but I’ve started to suss out where they exactly fit into that world building.

 

The taxonomy series really come out as the insectoid creatures of the world–which makes sense since, in my head, taxonomic structures are connected to insect collections.

 

I had one when I was a kid.  In a cigar box.  Grasshoppers were the hardest to catch.

 

The chimera series are almost like the old gods of the world.  Giant, eyeless, removed from the rest of the inhabitants of the the world, and totally without compassion for the other creatures that live there–which probably explains why a lot of the references in this series are dependent upon popular culture, fairy tales, and archetypes.

 

The scrump series would be the algae of the world.  Especially, since the amorphous ubiquity of the scrump comes from the mass in Tenchi Muyo, although the name and grotesque nature of the scrump comes from Lilo and Stitch.

 

The habitat series are the places that some of these creatures live (mostly the taxonomy insects).

 

It’s not eloquent or complete, but it was nice to have some of this world building situated more firmly in my head.

 

And, now, I must be away to sew more on the Sculpture That Will Not End.